Plein Air Tip Guide Preview

Problem 14: I Can't Seem To Draw With A Brush.
Central Park, Morning Light - oil - 9 x 12

Central Park, Morning Light - oil - 9 x 12

In nature there are no outlines, just dark or light shapes, so see objects in terms of solid shapes instead of outline. You can judge proportions much better this way. Don't worry about detail. Any details you add in the drawing stage will be covered up by big strokes of color.

Below is the Video Demo for Problem 14 from the Video section of the Package.

 
Problem 17: How Do I Know What Value To Make Each Object?
 

When we say "objects" in our painting we're really talking about the big planes of a landscape:

  • sky plane
  • ground plane
  • slanted planes
  • vertical planes

Squint your eyes to simplify these shapes, then compare the value of one shape to another, never judge the value of a plane by itself.  For example, a mountain may look dark compared to the sky, but it may appear lighter than the trees in front of it.  These four planes receive light at different angles so they won't ever be the same value.

Below is the Video Demo for Problem 17 from the Video section of the Package.

Winter Trek, oil, 24 x 30

Winter Trek, oil, 24 x 30

 
 
Problem 47: Why Are My Edges Important?

Edges help our paintings look more 3 dimensional. Both

hard and soft edges work together to keep the painting

from looking fat. Harder edges make objects come

forward and stick out of the canvas and softer edges

make objects recede, and when you combine them it

really creates a 3 dimensional efect.

You can also use harder edges around the focal point of

the painting to make it more important and softer

edges on objects that are closer to the outer edges and

are less important.

Below is the Video Demo for Problem 47 from the Video section of the Package.

Sunset on Mill Creek, oil, 30 x 40

Sunset on Mill Creek, oil, 30 x 40